Word of the Day – Welshcomb

By March 13, 2019 Word of the Day

Welshcomb (verb)

wel-sh-coam

To comb (the hair) using the thumb and fingers; to make (a person) ready in this way.

1920s; earliest use found in James Joyce (1882–1941), writer.

Example sentences

“Our house was disorganised growing up, no comb but my mother would just Welshcomb my hair every morning before school.”

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