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Word of the Day – Bayou

By May 31, 2022Word of the Day

Bayou (noun)

bi-oo

(in the southern US) a marshy outlet of a lake or river.

Mid 18th century from Louisiana French, from Choctaw bayuk.

Example sentences

“The freshwater lakes, bayous and coves offered the perfect sancturary for hundreds of birds.”

Word of the Day – Tronc

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Tronc (noun) tr-onk (in a hotel or restaurant) a common fund into which tips and service charges are paid for distribution to the staff. 1920s from French, literally ‘collecting box’.…

Word of the Day – Evoke

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Evoke (verb) ee-voke Bring or recall (a feeling, memory, or image) to the conscious mind. Early 17th century (in evoke (sense 2)): from Latin evocare, from e- (variant of ex-)…

Word of the Day – Distaff

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Distaff (noun) dis-taf A stick or spindle on to which wool or flax is wound for spinning. / (as modifier) Of or concerning women. Old English distæf the first element…

Word of the Day – Nuddy

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Nuddy (adj) nud-ee (informal, British) Naked; nude. 1950s humorous alteration of nude. (more…)

Word of the Day – Tilde

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Tilde (noun) til-da An accent (~) placed over Spanish n when pronounced ny (as in señor) or Portuguese a or o when nasalized (as in São Paulo), or over a…

Word of the Day – Swankpot

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Swankpot (noun) swank-pot (informal, British) (dated) A person attempting to impress others. (more…)

Word of the Day – Brackish

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Brackish (adj) brak-ish (of water) slightly salty, as in river estuaries. / something that lives in brackish water Mid 16th century from obsolete brack ‘salty’, from Middle Low German, Middle…

Word of the Day – Corybantic

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Corybantic (adj) kor-ee-ban-tik Wild; frenzied. Mid 17th century from Corybantes, Latin name of the priests of Cybele, a Phrygian goddess of nature, who performed wild dances, from Greek Korubantes+ -ic.…

Word of the Day – Imprecation

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Imprecation (noun) im-prek-ay-shun A spoken curse. Late Middle English from Latin imprecatio(n-), from imprecari ‘invoke (evil)’, from in- ‘towards’ + precari ‘pray’. (more…)

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