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Word of the Day – Landslide

By July 5, 2024Word of the Day

Landslide (noun)

land-sliyd

(2) An election or vote in which a particular victorious candidate or party receives an overwhelming mass or majority of votes.

From meaning 1: the downward falling or sliding of a mass of soil, detritus, or rock on or from a steep slope, or the mass itself.

Example sentences

“The exit polls show a landslide victory is predicted by the morning.”

Word of the Day – Brindle

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Brindle (noun/adj) brin-dl (noun) A brownish or tawny colour of animal fur, with streaks of other colour. (adj)brownish or tawny with streaks of other colour. 1670–80; alteration of brinded, with…

Word of the Day – Thalassophile

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Thalassophile (noun) thal-as-oh-fiyl Lover of the sea. From the Greek word 'Thalassa (more…)

Word of the Day – Hermitage

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Hermitage (noun) hur-mit-idj any secluded place of residence or habitation; retreat; hideaway, a place for a hermit. First recorded between 1250–1300. The sense of “any secluded place of residence” first…

Word of the Day – Elevenses

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Elevenses (noun) el-ev-en-siz a midmorning break for refreshments First recorded in 1840–65 and chiefly in British English usage.Originally a dialect of elevens, meaning “an eleven-o’clock meal.” Doubly pluralized form of…

Word of the Day – Caseophile

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Caseophile (noun) kas-ee-oh-fiyl A connoisseur or lover of cheese First recorded in 2005–10; from Latin cāse(us) “cheese” (more…)

Word of the Day – Pettifog

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Pettifog (verb) pet-ee-fog to bicker or quibble over trifles or unimportant matters. First recorded in 1605–15; back formation from pettifogger “ambulance chaser,” equivalent to petty “inferior, secondary” + fogger “shyster,”…

Word of the Day – Chockablock

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Chockablock (adj) chok-a-blok extremely crowded or full. First recorded in 1790–1800. Formed from chock, “wedge” + –a- (connective) + block, “solid mass of wood.” (more…)

Word of the Day – Dovetail

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Dovetail (verb) duv-tayl To join or fit together compactly or harmoniously. First recorded in 1555–65. So named from its shape, referring to a seamless joint. (more…)

Word of the Day – Heliolatry

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Heliolatry (noun) hel-ee-oh-lat-ree The religion of sunworship. / (ironically) those who like to sunbathe. First recorded in 1820–30. Formed from helio-, “sun” (more…)

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