10 Scarily Good Quotes from Stephen King

By September 21, 2016 September 21st, 2018 Authors, Quotations

Born on September 21st 1947 in Portland Maine Stephen King is a name synonymous with all things horror. His novels cover a vast range of subjects but all of them are guaranteed to leave you feeling just a little bit unsettled. It is well known that if King’s wife Tabitha had not pulled the unfinished draft of Carrie from the bin, read it and declared it worth finishing that her husband would probably still be a teacher and there would be no such thing as a Constant Reader.

With a life that includes drug addiction, alcoholism and almost being killed by a van being driven by a drunk and his dog, Stephen King continues to delight and horrify his loyal fans in equal measure, and here, for Constant Readers and new ones too are 10 scarily good quotes from Stephen King.

“Books are a uniquely portable magic.”

“Get busy living or get busy dying.”

“Monsters are real, and ghosts are real too. They live inside us, and sometimes, they win.”



“Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn’t carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life.”

“A short story is a different thing altogether – a short story is like a quick kiss in the dark from a stranger.”

“Speaking personally, you can have my gun, but you’ll take my book when you pry my cold, dead fingers off of the binding.”

“There are books full of great writing that don’t have very good stories. Read sometimes for the story… don’t be like the book-snobs who won’t do that. Read sometimes for the words–the language. Don’t be like the play-it-safers who won’t do that. But when you find a book that has both a good story and good words, treasure that book.”



“Some birds are not meant to be caged, that’s all. Their feathers are too bright, their songs too sweet and wild. So you let them go, or when you open the cage to feed them they somehow fly out past you. And the part of you that knows it was wrong to imprison them in the first place rejoices, but still, the place where you live is that much more drab and empty for their departure.”

“If you want to be a writer, you must do two things above all others: read a lot and write a lot.”

“The thing under my bed waiting to grab my ankle isn’t real. I know that, and I also know that if I’m careful to keep my foot under the covers, it will never be able to grab my ankle.”

If those quotes have piqued your interest and you fancy picking up a King novel and taking your first steps into becoming a Constant Reader, have a look through King’s extensive bibliographies which are available here.

Stephen King US
Stephen King UK

Remembering Herman Wouk, 1915-2019

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Every year at this time, the entire For Reading Addicts team remarks at how old Herman Wouk is. But this year when checking birthdays we were faced with the sad news that Wouk passed away on May 17th, just before his 104 birthday.

Born in the Bronx to Russian Jewish descendants on 27th May 1915, Bronx grew up as part of a struggling family in poverty. After his childhood, Wouk earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at the age of 19 from Columbia University and went on to serve as the editor of the university’s humor magazine, The Columbia Jester and thereafter would become a radio dramatist.

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Author Judith Kerr dies, aged 95

By | Authors, Children's Literature, News | No Comments
The author, Judith Kerr, best known for her children’s story The Tiger Who Came to Tea has died, aged 95 according to a statement from HarperCollins today. Kerr was considered to be one of Britain’s most successful children’s authors and was still producing stories and illustrations well into her 90s.

A skilled illustrator, and the ability to see the world from a children’s perspective made Judith Kerr one of the most talented children’s writers the world has ever seen. From the Tiger Who Came to Tea, to the Mog the Cat stories, Kerr had a way of talking to children and passing on important messages.

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The Life of Dorothy Hewett, Feminist Poet, Novelist and Playwright

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Dorothy Hewett (May 21st, 1923 – August 25th 2002) was an Australian poet, novelist and playwright known for her feminist writings. Considered one of Australia’s best-loved and respected writers, Hewett published many poetry collections, plays and novels, a lifetime’s work that earned her the accolade ‘The Order of Australia”.

Born in Perth, Western Australia, Hewett was raised on a sheep and wheat farm. She was initially home educated before attending Perth College, aged 15. While the college was run by Anglican nuns, Hewett was an atheist and remained so her entire life.

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8 Armistead Maupin Quotes that are Straight from the City

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Armistead Maupin (13th May 1944) is an American writer best known for his Tales of the City, a series of novels set in San Francisco.

Maupin was born in Washington DC and graduated from Needham Broughton High School before attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His first foray into writing was as a journalist for The Daily Tar Heel.

In 1974 he began what would become Tales of the City as a colum in the Pacific Sun newspaper, moving to the San Francisco Chronicle after the Sun’s San Francisco edition folded. Read More

8 Profound Quotes from Tana French

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Tana French (May 10th, 1973) is an American-Irish novelist and theatrical actor, best known for her crime fiction novels. Born in Vermont, French has lived in several countries including Ireland, Italy, the US and Malawi, due to her father’s job as an international economist. Today she resides in Dublin.

French loved both acting and writing from an early age and her debut novel, In the Woods, published in 2007 won the Edgar, Anthony, Macavity and Barry awards for best first novel. Today we’re looking at the author through some of her quotes, and the books they appeared in.
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Captain Scott 's Copperfield

Captain Scott ‘s copy of Dickens goes on display

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Captain Scott ‘s copy of the Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield will be going on display at the Charles Dickens Museum in London.

The book was taken on the Terra Nova expedition in 1910 by Captain Scott with the view to sustain morale among his men. Captain Scott and his men would take it in turns to read chapters to the group, keeping spirits up during the harsh Antarctic conditions. David Copperfield was written in periodical chapters with intriguing cliffhangers, making it perfect for reading aloud together.

There was a British tradition of taking libraries of books on expeditions, with Sir John Franklin taking over 1000 books with him on his 1845 journey to the Arctic including some novels by Charles Dickens such as The Pickwick Papers and Nicholas Nickleby. 

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