Kath’s Blog

For Reading Addicts has more to offer than just your run of the mill book reviews, I love to give our readers a bit more to get their proverbial teeth into! While I used to run FRA alone, we now have lots of enthusiastic literature lovers to help. As well as in the blog and pages sections, you’ll find us around our social media pages too so please try and remember we are people too, not just words on a screen.

It is on this page that you will find a whole plethora of interesting articles from the polls that require your input to a Word of the Day. In amongst the pages here you will find ‘me’ and hopefully, with your continued support – ‘you’ too.

My only sadness about the pages of Kath’s blog is that each new post does not have the same unmistakeable aroma of a new book, that you cannot feel the pages but rest assured, as much heart and soul has gone into these pages as a newly published novel.

Meet the Team



Word of the Day – Galligaskins

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Galligaskins (adj) gal-ig-ask-inz A type of loose knee-length pants. First recorded in 1570–80. Earlier forms include gallogascaine(s) and galigascon(s). Perhaps an alteration of obsolete French garguesque that was influenced by…

Word of the Day – Felonious

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Felonious (adj) fel-oh-nee-us Wicked; base; villainous. / pertaining to, of the nature of, or involving a felony. 1375–1425; felony + -ous; replacing late Middle English felonous<Anglo-French, Old French (more…)

Word of the Day – Oxymoron

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Oxymoron (noun) ok-see-maw-ron A figure of speech that produces an incongruous, seemingly self-contradictory effect. First recorded in 1650–60. Comes from the Late Latin word oxymorum. Oxymorum is from the presumed…

Word of the Day – Whoosis

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Whoosis (noun) hoo-zis an object or person whose name is not known or cannot be recalled. First recorded in 1920–25. An alteration of the phrase who’s this. (more…)

Quiz – Grimm Fairy Tales

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Jacob Grimm was born on the 4th January 1785, his brother Wilhelm Grimm on the 24th February 1786. This quiz celebrates some of their best loved stories, many of which…

Word of the Day – Stolid

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Stolid (adj) sto-lid Not easily stirred or moved mentally; unemotional; impassive. First recorded in 1595–1605; from the Latin stolidus “inert, dull, stupid” (more…)

Word of the Day – Saunter

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Saunter (verb/noun) sawn-ter to walk with a leisurely gait; stroll. / A leisurely walk or stroll. First recorded in 1660–70; of uncertain origin (more…)

Word of the Day – Ailurophile

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Ailurophile (noun) ai-loo-ree-oh-file A person who loves cats. First recorded in 1925–30 and comes from Greek aílouro(s), which means “cat” and –phile, meaning “enthusiast for.” (more…)

Quiz – WH Auden Funeral Blues – Missing Words

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To honour the birth of WH Auden on February 21st 1907 this missing words quiz is his most famous poem – Funeral Blues (published in 1938). The poem is in…

Word of the Day – Flâneur

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Flâneur (noun) (French) flan-oer a person who lounges or strolls around in a seemingly aimless way; an idler or loafer: First recorded in 1850–55; from French: literally, “loafer, idler, man…

Word of the Day – Oblique

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Oblique (adj) oh-bleek Indirectly stated or expressed; not straightforward. First recorded around 1400–50 and comes from the Latin term oblīquus, which means “slanting.” (more…)

Word of the Day – Taradiddle

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Taradiddle (noun) ta-ru-did-l a small lie; fib. First recorded in 1790–1800. An informal term with no clear etymology. (more…)

Quiz – Toni Morrison

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To celebrate one of America’s greatest writers birthday’s; Toni Morrison was born on the 18th February 1931 – a quiz to honour her life and works.   We've also just…

Word of the Day – Penurious

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Penurious (adj) pen-oo-ree-us Extremely stingy; parsimonious; miserly. Extremely poor; destitute; indigent. First recorded in 1590–1600; from Medieval Latin pēnūriōsus, from Latin paenūria, pēnūria penury + -ous (more…)

Word of the Day – Delexical

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Delexical (adj) de-lek-si-kal (linguistic) (of a verb) having little or no meaning in its own right, for example take in take a photograph. From Latin (more…)

Word of the Day – Perambulator

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Perambulator (noun) per-am-byu-lay-ter a baby carriage; pram. First recorded in 1605–15, but in 1850–55 for the highlighted sense. From Latin perambulāre, “to ramble, stroll.” (more…)

Word of the Day – Gendarme

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Gendarme (noun) zhan-darm a police officer in any of several European countries, especially a French police officer, or the Royal Moroccan police. 1540–50; Middle French, earlier gens d'armes, alteration of…

Word of the Day – Fornicate

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Fornicate (verb) faw-nik-ayt To have sexual intercourse with someone to whom one is not married. First recorded in 1545–55; from Late Latin fornicātus “consorted,” past participle of fornicārī “to consort…

Word of the Day – Acicula

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Acicula (noun) as-ik-yu-la A needlelike part; spine, bristle, or needlelike crystal. 1875–80; New Latin, Late Latin, alteration of acucula ornamental pin, equivalent to Latin acu-, stem of acus needle (more…)

Word of the Day – Quadriga

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Quadriga (noun) kwod-ree-ga (Classical Antiquity.) A two-wheeled chariot drawn by four horses harnessed abreast. 1720–30; Latin quadrīga, earlier plural quadrīgae, contraction of quadrijugae a team of four. (more…)