8 Things You might not know about H. P Lovecraft

By March 15, 2017Authors

H. P Lovecraft (20th August 1890 – 15th March 1937) was an American author who shaped the horror genre that we know today. Largely unappreciated until after his death, Lovecraft’s influence on the horror genre is still felt today.

Virtually unknown, Lovecraft only saw his works published in pulp magazines and died in poverty, but is now considered to be one of the most significant authors of his genre. And here are eight more things you may not know about H.P Lovecraft.

Both Lovecraft’s parents were institutionalised

Lovecraft’s father, Winfield Scott Lovecraft was committed to Butler Hospital with psychosis when the author was just three years old. He died five years later. Lovecraft’s mother, Sarah Susan Phillips Lovecraft was later committed to the same hospital in 1919. She remained in close correspondence with her son and died two years later of complications after surgery.

Lovecraft influenced Batman

If you’re a fan of the Batman comics you’ll know that the superhero often sends his enemies to Arkham Asylum. What you might not know is that the setting was invented by Lovecraft and was the name of a fictional city in many of the author’s works.

Lovecraft had aims to be a professional astronomer

When a young boy, Lovecraft had dreamed of being a professional astronomer, but only attended school sporadically and never finished high school. Although a keen amateur astronomer during his life, he never pursued it further.

Lovecraft was a racist bastard

We don’t want to skate around this one, in Lovecraft’s correspondence he was a nasty, horrible, racist bastard. We make no excuses for this side of his personality, and the evidence is plentiful given that he wrote 100,000 letters in his lifetime.

Lovecraft preferred cats to dogs

Or at least he wrote an essay on the subject. However, when you read the essay it has the typical slant of Lovecraft’s other works, but it’s interesting nonetheless.

Lovecraft suffered from night terrors

And they inspired much of his work. From around six years old Lovecraft was plagued with uncontrollable night time fears, linked to the illnesses suffered by his parents.

Which could explain why he was nocturnal

Lovecraft was rarely seen outside during daylight hours, writing all day and leaving the house only after sunset, study astronomy and write. He routinely slept days away and considered himself a recluse.

Cthulhu is pronounced ‘khul-loo’

Because we know you’ve wondered!

5 Things You Might Not Know About Alexandre Dumas

By | Authors, Literature | No Comments
On 24th July 1802 Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie, better known today as Alexandre Dumas was born in Picardy, France. The youngest of three children, and the only boy he was educated at military school and would go on to become one of the greatest writers of the day. His novels have been translated into over one hundred languages and today he is one of the most widely read French authors of all time.

Today, we’re filling in the gaps on his life, with five things you might not know about Alexandre Dumas and the books he wrote. Read More

New PD James Stories Coming This Autumn

By | Authors, New Releases, News | No Comments
When we lost PD James back in 2014, a world of crime lovers mourned, the author was the Queen of Crime, without a doubt and those who loved her will be thrilled to hear there are new stories coming this October.

Sleep No More is a new collection of short stories from the late author to be released just in time for the Christmas market. The six short stories all have a motive of revenge and vengence and will be published by Faber later this year. From unhappy marriages to bullying schoolmasters, this collection will have it all. Read More

15 Thought-Provoking Quotes by William Makepeace Thackeray

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William Makepeace Thackeray was a 19th century writer and poet known particularly for his satirical works of the time. He was born on the 18th of July in 1811 and died on Christmas Eve in 1863 after suffering a stroke aged just 52.

He was best known for his work Vanity Fair which follows the lives of Becky Sharp and Emmy Sedley  during and after the Napoleonic Wars. Thackeray worked often under a pseudonym as his work attacked the rich and powerful, and satirised early 19th-century British society.

His work is considered second only to Charles Dickens (depending on who you ask), and like Dickens his way with words is thought-provoking and full of wit.

Here are 15 of our favourite quotes taken from his many pieces of work…

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Shirley Hughes’ Top 5 Best Selling Books

By | Authors, Children's Literature | No Comments
Shirley Hughes is a British author and illustrator best known for her Alfie and Annie Rose series. Born on the 16th of July in 1927, she has written over fifty books and has illustrated more than two hundred. As a best selling author she has managed to sell more than 11.5 million copies, winning a multitude of literature and illustration awards.

For many British children in particular, she has been a large part of the childhood literary experience. Her illustrations are warm and colourful, and invoke memories of home cooked meals and cuddling up with a parent or grandparent for story time.

Shirley Hughes has been popular since 1960 and her work still holds up today as pieces of wonderful children’s literature. As a celebration of her writing and illustration, we have collated her top 5 best selling books according to Amazon.

Happy reading!

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One Comment

  • Phillip D Wolf says:

    Isn’t the pronunciation by him undetermined. ? I remember reading in a book that a child that he had contact with said that he pronounced it Kuh-too-loo ? I have to admit that your pronunciation makes more sense as it is more in line with the Greek pronunciation. For example chthonic in which the “ch” is silent.

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