I have always loved the idea of vampires, they are the one fictional character I still harbour a secret desire to meet in real life, and no not the vegetarian sparkly kind although I am a Twilight fan, but the proper vampires; I’m not stupid, I’d  be protected with my crucifix and garlic cloves of course. My preferred vampires are darkly dangerous, inhuman and truly horrifying vampires who don’t want you to love them, just entertain and feed them. With that in mind here are The Top Five Vampire Novels in the World according to me.

1, Salem’s Lot – Stephen King

I think this was the first ever vampire fiction I ever read and I don’t mind admitting I thought it was pant wettingly scary, and I’m still unnerved by it today. Stephen King at his finest brings you the stuff of nightmares and will have you garlanding your windows with garlic and holy water.
The Marston House in Jerusalem’s Lot has long been the subject of speculation and gossip, Ben Mears has returned in the hope of laying a few of his own demons to rest. Of course, this being King, you know it’s not going to be an easy ride.

Buy Salem’s Lot US
Buy Salem’s Lot UK

2, Interview With The Vampire – Anne Rice

I only read this a short time ago at the urging of many of you who follow us on our Facebook page. Why did I wait so long? Anne has managed to make vampires both horrifyingly frightening and desperately pitiful all at once and the introduction of Claudia, an ancient and worldly wise vampire trapped forever inside the body of a child is a real touch of genius. Not only that but this is the first in a series of (soon to be) 14 books, what more could you want?

 

Buy Interview With The Vampire US
Buy Interview With The Vampire UK



3,  Dracula  – Bram Stoker

No list of vampire literature would be complete without including the original novel. I read this over and over when I first had it, to the point of my copy falling apart and I never bored of it, I still haven’t. I loved the language, I loved the terrifying build up as Harker  voyaged to Transylvania and I loved the naughtiness. So many fictional creatures are improved upon as time passes but for me, Stoker’s Dracula will always be the best.

 

Buy Dracula US
Buy Dracula UK

4, I am Legend – Richard Matheson

Have you seen the film with Will Smith? You have? Forget it, the book absolutely wipes the floor with it and then kicks dirt in its face. I read this because I’d watched the film and quite enjoyed it. I read the book and was smitten!  Robert Neville is the (probable) sole survivor of a plague that has  left the rest  of the world rabid vampire like creatures of the night with an insatiable hunger and dwindling prey. Seriously if you loved the film, read this book, if you liked the film, read this book, Hell if you hated this film, read the book. You won’t be disappointed.

Buy I am Legend US
Buy I am Legend UK

5, Blood Brothers – Brian Lumley

The sixth Necromancer novel but the first in the Vampire World trilogy, this book will take you to alternate universe of Starside/Sunside and the eternal battle between the Wamphyri and the Szgany. Here we are lead to believe the vampires are defeated, all dead but as we all know, vampires have a tendency to not stay dead forever.  A really refreshing and truly horrifying take on the vampire genre.

 

Buy Blood Brothers US
Buy Blood Brothers UK

Those are the five that are my personal favourites but when it comes to vampire fiction I am always on the hunt for new material so if you have any that you think are missing from my list, please let us know in the comments.

The Life of Dorothy Hewett, Feminist Poet, Novelist and Playwright

By | Authors, Poetry | No Comments
Dorothy Hewett (May 21st, 1923 – August 25th 2002) was an Australian poet, novelist and playwright known for her feminist writings. Considered one of Australia’s best-loved and respected writers, Hewett published many poetry collections, plays and novels, a lifetime’s work that earned her the accolade ‘The Order of Australia”.

Born in Perth, Western Australia, Hewett was raised on a sheep and wheat farm. She was initially home educated before attending Perth College, aged 15. While the college was run by Anglican nuns, Hewett was an atheist and remained so her entire life.

Read More

8 Armistead Maupin Quotes that are Straight from the City

By | Authors, Quotations | No Comments
Armistead Maupin (13th May 1944) is an American writer best known for his Tales of the City, a series of novels set in San Francisco.

Maupin was born in Washington DC and graduated from Needham Broughton High School before attending the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His first foray into writing was as a journalist for The Daily Tar Heel.

In 1974 he began what would become Tales of the City as a colum in the Pacific Sun newspaper, moving to the San Francisco Chronicle after the Sun’s San Francisco edition folded. Read More

8 Profound Quotes from Tana French

By | Authors, Quotations | No Comments
Tana French (May 10th, 1973) is an American-Irish novelist and theatrical actor, best known for her crime fiction novels. Born in Vermont, French has lived in several countries including Ireland, Italy, the US and Malawi, due to her father’s job as an international economist. Today she resides in Dublin.

French loved both acting and writing from an early age and her debut novel, In the Woods, published in 2007 won the Edgar, Anthony, Macavity and Barry awards for best first novel. Today we’re looking at the author through some of her quotes, and the books they appeared in.
Read More

Captain Scott 's Copperfield

Captain Scott ‘s copy of Dickens goes on display

By | Authors, News | No Comments
Captain Scott ‘s copy of the Charles Dickens novel David Copperfield will be going on display at the Charles Dickens Museum in London.

The book was taken on the Terra Nova expedition in 1910 by Captain Scott with the view to sustain morale among his men. Captain Scott and his men would take it in turns to read chapters to the group, keeping spirits up during the harsh Antarctic conditions. David Copperfield was written in periodical chapters with intriguing cliffhangers, making it perfect for reading aloud together.

There was a British tradition of taking libraries of books on expeditions, with Sir John Franklin taking over 1000 books with him on his 1845 journey to the Arctic including some novels by Charles Dickens such as The Pickwick Papers and Nicholas Nickleby. 

Read More

Plagiarism lawsuit filed against Brazilian writer

By | Authors, News | No Comments
A plagiarism lawsuit has been filed by best-selling author Nora Roberts against Brazilian author Christiane Serruya. After a few speculative weeks, the case was finally taken to court where romance writer Serruya stands accused of copying work at a ‘rare and scandalous level’.

Nora Roberts, who has written 100s of novels and sold millions worldwide, filed the suit against Serruya in Rio De Janeiro.

The alleged plagiarism first brought to the attention of romance novelist Courtney Milan by her readers who uncovered many examples of almost identical passages taken from different authors. Fellow author Nora Roberts then discovered 41 authors over 93 books had been copied by Serruya, writing on her blog:

“The scope of her theft is so huge, so stunningly wide, she really has nowhere to go, no excuses or reasons that can possibly hold even a drop of water”.

Read More

Court orders release of unseen works by Franz Kafka

By | Authors, News | No Comments
Previously unseen manuscripts from Franz Kafka may be published after a court ruling.

The ruling comes after a decade-long battle with his estate to release a collection of papers kept by an Israeli family in their bank safe-deposit boxes. A district court in Zurich ruled that several of the boxes could be opened and their contents shipped to Israel’s national library.

The treasure trove of Kafka works could include previously unseen works, unfinished books, and personal writings. The work was originally given to Max Brod, Franz Kafka’s editor and publisher, and close friend shortly before Kafka’s death in 1924. He had actually asked for his writings to be destroyed but Brod ignored his wishes and decided to publish The Trial, The Castle, and Amerika, pushing the little-known author posthumously into the spotlight.

However, Brod didn’t publish everything and on his death in 1968, he instructed his personal secretary, Esther Hoffe, to transfer the Kafka papers to an academic institution. Hoffe instead took it upon herself to hide some the papers away and sold others; an original manuscript of The Trial was auctioned for £1m at Sotheby’s in London.

Read More