I have always loved the idea of vampires, they are the one fictional character I still harbour a secret desire to meet in real life, and no not the vegetarian sparkly kind although I am a Twilight fan, but the proper vampires; I’m not stupid, I’d  be protected with my crucifix and garlic cloves of course. My preferred vampires are darkly dangerous, inhuman and truly horrifying vampires who don’t want you to love them, just entertain and feed them. With that in mind here are The Top Five Vampire Novels in the World according to me.

1, Salem’s Lot – Stephen King

I think this was the first ever vampire fiction I ever read and I don’t mind admitting I thought it was pant wettingly scary, and I’m still unnerved by it today. Stephen King at his finest brings you the stuff of nightmares and will have you garlanding your windows with garlic and holy water.
The Marston House in Jerusalem’s Lot has long been the subject of speculation and gossip, Ben Mears has returned in the hope of laying a few of his own demons to rest. Of course, this being King, you know it’s not going to be an easy ride.

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2, Interview With The Vampire – Anne Rice

I only read this a short time ago at the urging of many of you who follow us on our Facebook page. Why did I wait so long? Anne has managed to make vampires both horrifyingly frightening and desperately pitiful all at once and the introduction of Claudia, an ancient and worldly wise vampire trapped forever inside the body of a child is a real touch of genius. Not only that but this is the first in a series of (soon to be) 14 books, what more could you want?

 

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3,  Dracula  – Bram Stoker

No list of vampire literature would be complete without including the original novel. I read this over and over when I first had it, to the point of my copy falling apart and I never bored of it, I still haven’t. I loved the language, I loved the terrifying build up as Harker  voyaged to Transylvania and I loved the naughtiness. So many fictional creatures are improved upon as time passes but for me, Stoker’s Dracula will always be the best.

 

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4, I am Legend – Richard Matheson

Have you seen the film with Will Smith? You have? Forget it, the book absolutely wipes the floor with it and then kicks dirt in its face. I read this because I’d watched the film and quite enjoyed it. I read the book and was smitten!  Robert Neville is the (probable) sole survivor of a plague that has  left the rest  of the world rabid vampire like creatures of the night with an insatiable hunger and dwindling prey. Seriously if you loved the film, read this book, if you liked the film, read this book, Hell if you hated this film, read the book. You won’t be disappointed.

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5, Blood Brothers – Brian Lumley

The sixth Necromancer novel but the first in the Vampire World trilogy, this book will take you to alternate universe of Starside/Sunside and the eternal battle between the Wamphyri and the Szgany. Here we are lead to believe the vampires are defeated, all dead but as we all know, vampires have a tendency to not stay dead forever.  A really refreshing and truly horrifying take on the vampire genre.

 

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Those are the five that are my personal favourites but when it comes to vampire fiction I am always on the hunt for new material so if you have any that you think are missing from my list, please let us know in the comments.

Rowling Receives Honour from the Queen for Services to Literature

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2017 has been quite the year for J. K Rowling, in a writing career that in twenty years shows no signs of slowing down. This year has seen the Fantastic Beasts franchise explode, so much so that we’re still waiting for Lethal White, the latest in the Cormoran Strike series from her Robert Galbraith pseudonym. Now Rowling has been honoured at Buckingham Palace for services to literature too in a rare accolade that is surely the cherry on the pie for the much-loved author. Read More

MI5 Kept Dossier on ‘Young Communist’ Kingsley Amis

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A newly declassified dossier has shown that MI5 in the UK kept tabs on author Kingsley Amis when he was at Oxford University, referring to him as “a very promising member of the Communist Party”. The dossier, which may shock many shows that the Secret Service asked local constabularies for reports on the young academic and even quizzed Army commanders about his conduct. Read More

Darwin’s Annotated Origin Of Species To Be Sold At Auction

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A copy of Charles Darwin’s Origin Of Species has been discovered, complete with handwritten annotations by Darwin himself.  A translator of the German manuscript, HG Bronn, was thought to have had the annotated sheets when he died in 1862. Once they were retrieved and bound, the sheets were handed over to the German palaeontologist, and Darwin’s correspondent, Melchior Neumayr. The volume has apparently been with Neumayr’s descendants until now.

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The Private Lives of Authors: Emily Dickinson

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Emily Dickinson (1830 – 1886) was an American poet born in Massachusetts, USA. She grew up in a wealthy family, and was by all accounts a good child, causing no trouble and spending her time playing piano and reading.

Emily was a very bright young woman, and studied hard, but was plagued by morose thoughts of death. After a close friend died of typhus, Emily’s troubling thoughts of death deepened commenting a couple of years later: “it seemed to me I should die too if I could not be permitted to watch over her or even look at her face.”

As a young woman, Emily dove into poetry, reading Wordsworth and Ralph Waldo Emerson, finding influence in Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre and work by William Shakespeare.

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