Almost Two-Thirds Of The World’s Illiterate Adults Are Women.

By October 10, 2017Literature, News

Global illiteracy is still a major issue in the 21st century with 774 million illiterate adults (people over the age of 15) all over the world.

493 million (two-thirds) of those illiterate adults are women. This discrepancy is shocking to many of us but it is one that needs to be addressed.

Back in 2010 the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation director-general, Irina Bokova, said: “newly literate women have a positive ripple effect on all development indicators”. Teaching women to read has a great positive affect on the development of themselves, their family and their community.

Katy Newell-Jones of Feed the Minds supports Bokova’s comments by adding: “On its own, literacy neither saves lives nor fills hungry mouths. However, we encounter women’s literacy time and time again as a valuable component in women’s empowerment. A woman who is able to keep her own business records is more likely to be able to manage her income and expenditure; and the children of a literate mother are more likely to complete their education.”

National Institute of Adult Continuing Education report on women’s right to literacy insists on an holistic approach to literacy education. It is more effective to teach reading and writing while linking it to practical and useful skills: “Literacy learning is particularly effective when it is linked to, integrated with or embedded in other learning. Such approaches produce stronger outcomes in both literacy and vocational education and training. Women who want to be successful traders, efficient farmers, contribute to school governance and rear healthy children must be equipped with the necessary, associated literacy skills.”

Check out the BBC video below for further insight into the global literacy problem.







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By | Discussion and Recommendations, News, Reading Habits | No Comments
For the first time since he left office, the former President of the United States, Barack Obama, has returned to Africa where he spent time in both Kenya (his ancestral home) and South Africa. There he met 200 young leaders from all over the continent and made a speech to commemorate the 100th birthday of Nelson Mandela.

Prior to his visit, Obama published a post on his official Facebook page where he wrote about his love for his ancestral home, and revealed what books he’s been reading in the build up to his trip. As you would expect, the books are from and about the continent of Africa and show what a diverse, historic, sometimes troubled, but also extraordinary continent it is. Not only has Obama recommended the books, but also provided a quick insight as to why he found them interesting. Read More

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Sometimes the literary industry can be a little depressing. We keep being told of independent bookshops closing, and many people seem to think reading is going out of fashion, yet consistently there are figures that buck these trends showing reading is as popular as ever, and Bloomsbury’s first quarter sales for 2018 show just that! Read More

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By | Authors, Children's Literature, News | No Comments
Clive King, who brought us the children’s classic Stig of the Dump has died aged 94 earlier this week.

Born David Clive King in Richmond, Surrey on 24th April 1924, King grew up in Ash in Kent and was educated at the King’s School, Rochester before eventually graduating with a BA in English. From 1943 to 1946 King served as a Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve, which took him to many places around the world including Japan where he saw the then recent devastation of Hiroshima.
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By | Children's Literature, News | No Comments
LGBT advocates have banned a children’s book from Amazon!

Censorship is a topic we do not shy away from here at For Reading Addicts, and everyone in our community has an opinion on it. It has been quite a black and white issue for most readers- either they want all books to be published and none to be banned- or they feel it is fine to ban some topics (depending on their own political/moral leanings).

Either way it causes some discussion among book clubs and literary groups alike.

One such group is Family Rhetoric on Facebook, run by Amber Leventry- an LGBTQ advocate- who was disturbed by a title while looking for children’s books on Amazon. Amber discovered a children’s book that horrified her so much that it had to be shared with her followers on Facebook, and drove them to report the title en-masse in hopes of banning it from the major book distributer.

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Books are one of the few luxuries inmates in prisons do have access to and they can be essential when it comes to keeping the minds of the incarcerated stimulated. Generally speaking, most books are okay for prisoners to read, provided they’re first checked for hidden contraband, but it seems George R.R. Martin’s fantasy series A Song of Ice and Fire has fallen foul of the law.

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By | Literature, News | No Comments
Stormzy was born Michael Omari in July 1993 in London. He rose to fame as a grime artist and rapper, and won ‘Best Grime Act’ at the 2014 and 2015 MOBO Awards. His debut album, Gang Signs & Prayer, was released in 2017 and was the first ever grime album to reach number one on the UK Albums Chart.

Ever the supporter of new artists and ambitious, young people, Stormzy has teamed up with Penguin Random House to create his own imprint #Merky Books. This will be added to his other projects: his record label, #Merky Records, and his own music festival in Ibiza, #Merky Festival.

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