Word of the Day – Mimping

By February 17, 2017Word of the Day

Mimping (noun)

mim-ping

Affectedly dainty behaviour, primness: Speaking in a prissy manner, usually with pursed lips.

First used in the mid eighteenth century and attributed to David Garrick (1717–1779), actor and playwright mimping has fallen out of use and is now considered archaic.

Example sentences

“To watch them mimping about you’d never believe these were accomplished boxers.”

“His mimping overwhelms anything the man has to say; I cannot help but compare his mouth to a cat’s behind.”

Word of the Day – Antidisestablishmentarianism

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Antidisestablishmentarianism(noun)

an-tee-dis-est-ab-lis-ment-aer-ee-an-izm

Opposition to the disestablishment of the Church of England.

Antidisestablishmentarianism is very occasionally found in genuine use, but it is most often cited as an example of a very long word. Other similar curiosities are floccinaucinihilipilification and pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (the longest word in this dictionary).

Read More

Word of the Day

Word of the Day – Kickshaw

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Kickshaw (noun) (archaic)

kik-shor

A fancy but insubstantial cooked dish, especially one of foreign origin. Or, An elegant but insubstantial trinket.

Late 16th century: from French quelque chose ‘something’. The French spelling was common in the 17th century; the present form results from interpretation of quelque chose as plural.

Read More

Word of the Day – Chimaera

By | Word of the Day | No Comments

Chimaera (noun) (also Chimera)

kai-mee-ra

(in Greek mythology) a fire-breathing female monster with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, and a serpent’s tail. (modern biology) An organism containing a mixture of genetically different tissues, formed by processes such as fusion of early embryos, grafting, or mutation.

Late Middle English: via Latin from Greek khimaira ‘she-goat or chimaera’.

Read More

Leave a Reply