Word of the Day – Monodactyl

By September 10, 2017Word of the Day

Monodactyl (noun)

mo-no-dak-til

A condition in which there is only one finger or toe on each hand or foot.

Late 19th century: from monodactyl (from Greek monodaktulos ‘one-fingered’) + -y.

Example sentences

“Though horses are mondactyl creatures, researchers think they once had many toes.”

Word of the Day – Cleat

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Cleat (noun)

Kl-eet

A T-shaped piece of metal or wood on a boat or ship, to which ropes are attached.

Each of a number of projections on the sole of a shoe, designed to prevent the wearer losing their footing.

Middle English (in the sense ‘wedge’): of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch kloot ‘ball, sphere’ and German Kloss ‘clod, dumpling’, also to clot and clout.

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Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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