Word of the Day – Objurgate

By October 10, 2017Word of the Day
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Objurgate (verb)

ob-juh-gayt

Severely rebuke, scold.

Early 17th century: from Latin objurgat- ‘chided, rebuked’, from the verb objurgare, based on jurgium ‘strife’.

Example sentences

“Don’t objurgate the child, anyone can spill milk!”

Word of the Day – Drongo

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Drongo (noun) (NZ)

dron-go

A stupid or incompetent person.

Mid 19th century: from Malagasy. drongo (sense 2) is said to be from the name of an Australian racehorse of the 1920s which consistently finished last or near last.
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Word of the Day – Gerundive

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Gerundive (noun) (grammar)

jer-un-div

A form of a Latin verb, ending in -ndus (declinable) and functioning as an adjective meaning ‘that should or must be done’.

Middle English (in the sense ‘gerund’): from late Latin gerundivus (modus) ‘gerundive (mood)’, from gerundium (see gerund).

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