Word of the Day – Procellous

By February 17, 2018 Word of the Day

Procellous (adj) (rare)

pro-sell-us

Stormy, turbulent.

Early 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Goffe (?1591–1629), playwright and Church of England clergyman. From French † procelleux from classical Latin procellōsus stormy from procella + -ōsus.

Example sentences

“She landed on a procellous night and we never found where she came from.”

Word of the Day – Cogitate

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Cogitate (adj)

koj-i-tayt

Think deeply about something; meditate or reflect.

Late 16th century: from Latin cogitat- ‘considered’, from the verb cogitare, from co- ‘together’ + agitare ‘turn over, consider’.

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Word of the Day – Careen

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Careen (verb)

ka-reen

(of a ship) tilt; lean over.
Move swiftly and in an uncontrolled way.

Late 16th century (as a noun denoting the position of a careened ship): from French carène, from Italian carena, from Latin carina ‘a keel’. Sense 2 was influenced by the verb career.

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Word of the Day – Lacet

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Lacet (noun)

la-set

A flat braided tape; especially a braid used to form designs on lace. Also: braided work, especially on lace. Frequently attributive, as “lacet braid”, “lacet work”, etc.

A hairpin bend in a road.

Early 19th century; earliest use found in Ladies’ Monthly Museum. From French lacet flat braided tape, braid used to form designs on lace from lace + -et
mid 19th century. From French lacet hairpin bend, specific sense development of lacet lace.

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