Word of the Day – Procellous

By February 17, 2018Word of the Day

Procellous (adj) (rare)

pro-sell-us

Stormy, turbulent.

Early 17th century; earliest use found in Thomas Goffe (?1591–1629), playwright and Church of England clergyman. From French † procelleux from classical Latin procellōsus stormy from procella + -ōsus.

Example sentences

“She landed on a procellous night and we never found where she came from.”

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun)

sen-ek-ti-tood

The last stage of life; old age.

Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning “old age,” which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a derivative of the noun senex meaning “old man.” Senectitude entered English in the late 1700s, more precisely, in 1796 in Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels

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