Word of the Day – Blandishment

By May 20, 2018Word of the Day

Blandishment (noun)

blan-dish-ment

A flattering or pleasing statement or action used as a means of gently persuading someone to do something.

Example sentences

“The problem with choosing a holiday is trying to read between all the blandishments in the brochure.”

Word of the Day – Nosegay

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Nosegay (noun) (literary) no-s-gei A small bunch of flowers, typically one that is sweet-scented. Late Middle English: from nose + gay in the obsolete sense ‘ornament’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Senectitude

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Senectitude (noun) sen-ek-ti-tood The last stage of life; old age. Senectitude comes from the Medieval Latin noun senectitūdō meaning "old age," which in turn comes from Classical Latin senectūs, a…

Word of the Day – Vadimony

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Vadimony (noun) (obsolete) vad-i-mo-nee A bond or pledge for appearance before a judge on a certain day. Latin. From vas (“surety, bail”) +‎ -mōnium (“obligation”). (more…)

Word of the Day – Armorial

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Armorial (adj) ah-mor-ee-al Relating to heraldry or heraldic devices. Late Middle English: from Old French armoierie (see armoury). (more…)

Word of the Day – Consanguineous

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Consanguineous (adj) kon-san-gwin-ee-us Relating to or denoting people descended from the same ancestor. A blood relation. Early 17th century: from Latin consanguineus ‘of the same blood’ (from con- ‘together’ +…

Word of the Day – Futtock

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Futtock (noun) fut-ok Each of the middle timbers of a ship's frame, between the floor and the top timbers. Middle English: perhaps from Middle Low German, or from foot +…

Word of the Day – Acentric

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Acentric (adj) ay-sen-trik Without a centre; not centralised. (more…)

Word of the Day – Poltroon

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Poltroon (noun)(archaic) pol-troon An utter coward Early 16th century: from French poltron, from Italian poltrone, perhaps from poltro ‘sluggard’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Eventuate

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Eventuate (verb) ee-ven-too-ate Occur as a result Late 18th century (originally US): from event, on the pattern of actuate. (more…)

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