Word of the Day – Mattamore

By September 14, 2018 Word of the Day

Mattamore (noun) (rare)

mat-e-mor

In northern Africa and the Middle East: a storehouse, cistern, prison, etc., located underground.

Late 17th century. From French matamore, † matamorre and its etymon Arabic maṭmūra from ṭamara to cover up, bury.

Example sentences

“They store them in the mattamore.”

Word of the Day – Entropy

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Entropy (noun) en-trop-ee Lack of order or predictability; gradual decline into disorder. Mid 19th century from en-‘inside’ + Greek tropē ‘transformation’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Madrigal

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Madrigal (noun) mad-rig-ul A part-song for several voices, especially one of the Renaissance period, typically unaccompanied and arranged in elaborate counterpoint. From Italian madrigale (from medieval Latin carmen matricale ‘simple…

Word of the Day – Scapula

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Scapula (noun) skap-yu-la The technical name for a shoulder blade Late 16th century from late Latin, singular of Latin scapulae ‘shoulder blades’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Resplendent

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Respeldent (adj) res-plen-dent Attractive and impressive through being richly colourful or sumptuous. Late Middle English from Latin resplendent- ‘shining out’, from the verb resplendere, from re- (expressing intensive force) +…

Word of the Day – Cabal

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Cabal (noun) ka-bal A secret political clique or faction. Late 16th century (denoting the Kabbalah): from French cabale, from medieval Latin cabala (see (more…)

Word of the Day – Palfrey

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Palfrey (noun) (archaic) pawl-free A docile horse used for ordinary riding, especially by women. Middle English from Old French palefrei, from medieval Latin palefredus, alteration of late Latin paraveredus, from…

Word of the Day – Circadian

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Circadian (adj) sur-kay-dee-un (of biological processes) recurring naturally on a twenty-four-hour cycle, even in the absence of light fluctuations. 1950s formed irregularly from Latin circa ‘about’ + dies ‘day’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Scrump

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Scrump (verb) sk-rump Steal (fruit) from an orchard. Mid 19th century from dialect scrump ‘withered apple’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Purulent

| Word of the Day | No Comments
Purulent (adj) pew-rew-lent Consisting of, containing, or discharging pus. Late Middle English from Latin purulentus ‘festering’, from pus, pur- (see pus). (more…)

Leave a Reply