Word of the Day – Ostensibly

By September 5, 2019 Word of the Day

Ostensibly (adverb)

os-ten-sib-lee

As appears or is stated to be true, though not necessarily so; apparently.

Example sentences

“The secretary resigned, ostensibly from ill health.”

Word of the Day – Supplicate

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Supplicate (verb) sup-lik-ayt Ask or beg for something earnestly or humbly. Late Middle English from Latin supplicat- ‘implored’, from the verb supplicare, from sub- ‘from below’ + placere ‘propitiate’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Traduce

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Traduce (verb) trad-use Speak badly of or tell lies about (someone) so as to damage their reputation. Mid 16th century (in the sense ‘transport, transmit’): from Latin traducere ‘lead in…

Word of the Day – Disyllabic

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Disyllabic (adj) dai-sil-ab-ik Consisting of two syllables. Or (as in bird song or a siren) created by two distinct notes. Mid 17th century from French dissyllabique, via Latin from Greek…

Word of the Day – Waddle

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Waddle (noun/verb) wad-l A clumsy gait Late 16th century perhaps a frequentative of wade. (more…)

Word of the Day – Taiko

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Taiko (noun) tai-ko A Japanese barrel-shaped drum. Late 19th century Japanese. (more…)

Word of the Day – Phthisiophobia

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Phthisiophobia (noun) (historic) fiz-ee-o-fo-bee-a An irrational or exaggerated fear of tuberculosis. Late 19th century; earliest use found in The Lancet. From phthisio- + -phobia, perhaps after French phthisiophobie. (more…)

Word of the Day – Thicket

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Thicket (noun) thik-it A dense group of bushes or trees. Old English thiccet (see thick) (more…)

Word of the Day – Efficacy

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Efficacy (noun) ef-ik-a-see The ability to produce a desired or intended result. Early 16th century from Latin efficacia, from efficax, efficac- (more…)

Word of the Day – Impunity

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Impunity (noun) im-poo-ni-tee Exemption from punishment or freedom from the injurious consequences of an action. Mid 16th century from Latin impunitas, from impunis ‘unpunished’, from in- ‘not’ + poena ‘penalty’…

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