15 Literary References in The Simpsons

By April 19, 2017Culture, Television

The Simpsons is an animated television series about a dysfunctional-yet-loving family living in the fictional town of Springfield. The family consists of Homer, the father, and Marge, the mother, and their three children- Bart, Lisa, and Maggie. The creator, Matt Groening, came up with the concept of a satirical look at the American family in the late 1980s and, along with producer James. L. Brooks, created a series of animated shorts. These short cartoons were first shown on the Tracy Ullman Show on the 19th of April 1987, and after 3 seasons on there, it was commissioned for a half hour stand-alone television show for prime time.

Still going strong today, The Simpsons is now the longest running animated series on television, and the longest running American sitcom.

My favourite member of the Simpson family is the studious Lisa Simpson. As a fellow middle child, her frustrations and occasional angsty moments really resonated with me. Many Reading Addicts also feel a kinship with Lisa as she is a bookish soul, always happy to visit the Springfield Library, or relax at home with a book. The Simpsons has included some fabulous literary references: here we have put together some of our favourite literary moments spotted over the years, mostly involving lovely Lisa Simpson!

Discover The Simpsons Family History here:

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Turkish Garbage Collectors Open Library Full of Discarded Books

By | Culture, Libraries, News | No Comments
Turkish garbage collectors in the country’s capital city of Ankara have opened a public library that is full of books that were originally destined to be put into landfill. The workers began collecting discarded books and opened the new library in the Çankaya district of Ankara. News of the library has spread and now people have begun donating books directly to the library, rather than throwing them away. Read More

Sad and Bad Bunnies Star in Their Own Violent True Stories

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An American charity, Youth Ambassadors, which was established in 2010 has produced a book of true stories based on American children’s lives,. The book is full of cutesy animal characters drawn in juxtaposition with violent and shocking stories, in a collection named ‘Welcome To My Neighbourhood’.

Their website states the charity is an: “educational, not-for-profit employment program designed to empower underserved youth with the knowledge that they as teenagers have a vital voice. They have the power to be active participants in their communities, not just passive observers.”

The book is meant to highlight the scary situations some children experience in their lives, and the awful reality many disadvantaged kids live through.

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5 Strange and Creepy Seasonal Creature Myths for Christmas

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Christmas time is full of strange customs and celebrations from cultures across Europe. Before Christmas time became what it is today, Pagan Europeans were marking Yule in their own way. Pagan celebrations eventually merged with Christian festivities, marking Christ’s birth instead of the Roman sun-god, Sol, and became something much like how we now celebrate.

Though people merged their cultures and adopted the Christian celebrations, some myths and local customs remain… And some of these are seriously creepy myths…

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A Very Literary Hanukah!

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A very happy Hanukah to our Jewish Reading Addicts!

If you are looking for some bookish ideas to spruce up you Hanukah celebrations then look no further. We have gathered together some of the internet’s finest literary bookish menorahs meant to interest the most dedicated bookish reader celebrating Hanukah.

Check out these fantastic creations.

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Amusingly Titled Gay Pulp Fiction of the 20th Century

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Pulp fiction is a popular and cheap way to produce books of low quality for mass consumption. In the early to mid-20th century popular pulp fiction titles included rather risqué publications about the sexual exploits of lesbian and gay couples.

Beginning in the 1930s, these pulp fiction books were sold in bus stations, newsstands, and general stores. Lesbian pulp fiction was far more popular than stories about gay men, due to their appeal to heterosexual men. The first original pulp nonfiction to feature male gay sex was in 1952, called Men Into Beasts, but it was more brutal and horrifying than the erotic and romantic fictions that followed.

In the 1960s gay press associations such as Guild Press, and Greenleaf Classics produced varied erotica and pornographic pulp fiction for and about homosexual men. Rather than being pieces of high literature the gay pulps were unashamedly created to titilate and arouse the reader. Each piece of pulp fiction of the time was produced with a colourful cover to catch the eye, and a provocative title.

We have gathered together some of the most amusing, shocking titles that were once available… Be warned- this is NOT safe for work!

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The Horse-Riding Librarians of the 1930s

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You may know a badass librarian of two, a school librarian who was a stickler for the rules, or a community librarian who would go above and beyond for her library-goers. Have you ever met a librarian who would traverse snowy mountains to provide books and other reading materials for her people?

If your community was cut off from the rest of the country, how would you access your new and favourite books?

Back in the 1930s, after the Great Depression, there was a lack of funds for public services such as libraries. In around May 1936 the American Library Association estimated that over a third of all Americans had no real access to public libraries.

The Pack Horse Library Project was started in 1935 to help tackle this problem in the area of the Appalachian Mountains. This area of Kentucky, USA was particularly inaccessible back then, with over 30% of the rural community there being illiterate. The poorer communities realised that literacy was one way out of poverty so they banded together to donate books, and facilities to store books.

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