Word of the Day – Tumescent

By May 17, 2019 Word of the Day

Tumescent (adj)

toom-es-unt

Swollen or becoming swollen, especially as a response to sexual arousal.

(especially of language or literary style) pompous or pretentious.

Mid 19th century: from Latin tumescent- ‘beginning to swell’, from the verb tumescere, from tumere ‘to swell’.

Example sentences

“My editor said that using tumescent(1) in my erotic fiction made the whole thing slightly tumescent(2).”

Word of the Day – Effrontery

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Effrontery (noun) e-frun-ter-ee Insolent or impertinent behaviour. Late 17th century from French effronterie, based on late Latin effrons, effront- ‘shameless, barefaced’, from ex- ‘out’ + frons ‘forehead’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Bansuri

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Bansuri (noun) ban-soo-ree A bamboo transverse flute, popular in northern India. (more…)

Word of the Day – Ecumenical

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Ecumenical (adj) eek-yu-men-i-kal Representing a number of different Christian Churches. Late 16th century (in the sense ‘belonging to the universal Church’): via late Latin from Greek oikoumenikos from oikoumenē ‘the…

Word of the Day – Temperance

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Temperance (noun) temp-er-uns Abstinence from alcoholic drink. Middle English from Anglo-Norman French temperaunce, from Latin temperantia ‘moderation’, from temperare ‘restrain’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Juxtaposition

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Juxtaposition (noun) juk-sta-pos-ishun The fact of two things being seen or placed close together with contrasting effect. Mid 19th century (earlier (Middle English) as juxtaposition): from French juxtaposer, from Latin…

Word of the Day – Sully

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Sully (verb) sul-ee Damage the purity or integrity of. Late 16th century perhaps from French souiller ‘to soil’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Vicarious

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Vicarious (adj) vik-air-ee-us Experienced in the imagination through the feelings or actions of another person. Mid 17th century from Latin vicarius ‘substitute’ (see vicar) + -ous. (more…)

Word of the Day – Quotidian

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Quotidian (adj) kwot-id-ee-an Occurring every day. Middle English via Old French from Latin quotidianus, earlier cotidianus, from cotidie ‘daily’. (more…)

Word of the Day – Bacchanalia

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Bacchanalia (noun) bak-an-ay-lee-a 1. (historic) The Roman festival of Bacchus. 2. Drunken celebrations Late 16th century from Latin bacchanalia, neuter plural of the adjective bacchanalis (see (more…)

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