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Word of the Day – Festoon

By August 7, 2023Word of the Day

Festoon (noun)

fes-toon

a string or chain of flowers, foliage, ribbon, suspended in a curve between two points.

Festoon can also be a verb meaning “to adorn with festoons. Festoon entered English between 1670–80. It comes via French from the Italian word festone, meaning “decoration for a feast.”

Example sentences

“The festoon flowers adoraned the trailer on every side.”

Word of the Day – Kismet

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Kismet (noun) kiz-met fate; destiny. First recorded in 1840–50 and comes from Turkish ultimately from Arabic qisma, qismat-, meaning “division, portion, lot, fate.” Although a term from Islam, kismet is…

Word of the Day – Esculent

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Esculent (adj) es-kyu-lent suitable for use as food; edible. First recorded in 1615–25 and comes from Latin ēsculentus, “edible, full of food.” Esculentus shares a root with escarole, “a broad…

Word of the Day – Galligaskins

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Galligaskins (adj) gal-ig-ask-inz A type of loose knee-length pants. First recorded in 1570–80. Earlier forms include gallogascaine(s) and galigascon(s). Perhaps an alteration of obsolete French garguesque that was influenced by…

Word of the Day – Felonious

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Felonious (adj) fel-oh-nee-us Wicked; base; villainous. / pertaining to, of the nature of, or involving a felony. 1375–1425; felony + -ous; replacing late Middle English felonous<Anglo-French, Old French (more…)

Word of the Day – Oxymoron

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Oxymoron (noun) ok-see-maw-ron A figure of speech that produces an incongruous, seemingly self-contradictory effect. First recorded in 1650–60. Comes from the Late Latin word oxymorum. Oxymorum is from the presumed…

Word of the Day – Whoosis

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Whoosis (noun) hoo-zis an object or person whose name is not known or cannot be recalled. First recorded in 1920–25. An alteration of the phrase who’s this. (more…)

Word of the Day – Stolid

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Stolid (adj) sto-lid Not easily stirred or moved mentally; unemotional; impassive. First recorded in 1595–1605; from the Latin stolidus “inert, dull, stupid” (more…)

Word of the Day – Saunter

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Saunter (verb/noun) sawn-ter to walk with a leisurely gait; stroll. / A leisurely walk or stroll. First recorded in 1660–70; of uncertain origin (more…)

Word of the Day – Ailurophile

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Ailurophile (noun) ai-loo-ree-oh-file A person who loves cats. First recorded in 1925–30 and comes from Greek aílouro(s), which means “cat” and –phile, meaning “enthusiast for.” (more…)

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